No Dairy Alternatives to Cows Milk

My Daughter Kate is allergic to dairy products, so we have had to work around this with alternative sources of dairy since she was born. Now did you know that Non Dairy Milk can easily substitute for cow’s milk as a beverage, in recipes of all sorts, and in many other ways?

It can even be used to produce a nice, creamy home made yogurt. Although not normally quite as thick as dairy yogurt, it can be thickened through the use of agar powder, corn starch or arrowroot. If using corn starch, which is readily available, mix 2 tsp. of starch in 30 ml. of cold water and add the mixture to the soy milk just before boiling.

As has been said, the flavor is different, so a little experimenting might be in order. Some, for instance, suggest adding a touch of vanilla flavoring to soy milk when using it on cereal. Soy beans have an 18 month shelf life, so home made soy milk is a good candidate for your long term, food storage program.

Rice Milk: Although it can be found in some stores, it is less common than soy milk. Fortunately, it too can be produced at home.

Compared with cow’s milk, rice milk contains more carbohydrates, but no cholesterol or lactose. Neither does it contain significant amounts of calcium or protein. You will have to assure that you are getting enough of these two important nutrients in other ways. Rice milk is not as thick as dairy milk or soy milk, and seems to have a bit of a translucent quality. It is naturally sweet, making it great for dessert recipes, but less useful where that sweetness is not needed or wanted. Consequently, some people like it on cereal while others don’t – simply a matter of personal preference. Rice milk can be used in the production of home made yogurt, but the end result is very runny, making it more of a yogurt drink than a food you would spoon from a bowl or cup.

Oat Milk: Oat milk like rice milk is a grain milk, and has similar nutritional qualities. It lacks the pronounced sweetness, however, and some suggest the addition of honey as a sweetener in order to increase its palatability, although not everyone would agree that this is needed. The lack of extra sweetness does, however, make it a better candidate for use in soups and sauces and other recipes where a sugary taste is not wanted. Described as light in texture with a very mild flavor, many agree that it substitutes very well for low-fat or fat-free milk.

Oat milk is lactose free, a great benefit to those who are lactose intolerant, but it does contain gluten, a fact that needs to be noted by those who have a gluten sensitivity. Oat milk is a good source of dietary fiber.

Potato Milk: Said to duplicate the texture of dairy milk, and to come amazingly close to it in taste, potato milk is increasingly being recommended for those placed on a wheat-free, dairy free diet. Potatoes, being one of the most tolerated foods (meaning very few people have allergies or intolerances to it), makes potato milk an ideal candidate for such uses. Many have tried it in smoothies, on cereal, and for baking with generally positive results. Potato milk does have a high carbohydrate content, but it also has a high potassium content as well as containing plenty of other vitamins and minerals.

You can make your own, but, unfortunately, potatoes do not have the shelf life of soy beans, nuts, and rice or other grains, so when it comes to long term food storage programs, potato milk has some deficiencies in that regard.